4.1
8 votes

Rhyolite Ghost Town

Off Highway 374, Beatty, Nevada 89003 USA

Free
Free to Visit
  • Independent
  • Pet Friendly
  • No Wifi
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“A ghost town with a link to the past”

This place is on private property. Listing for informational purposes only. Please do not visit without express permission from the land owner. Her birth was brought about by Shorty Harris and E. L. Cross, who were prospecting in the area in 1904. They found quartz all over a hill, and as Shorty describes it “... the quartz was just full of free gold... it was the original bullfrog rock... this banner is a crackerjack” declared Shorty! “The district is going to be the banner camp of Nevada. I say so once and I’ll say it again.” At that time there was only one other person in the whole area: Old Man Beatty who lived in a ranch with his family five miles away. Soon the rush was on and several camps were set up including Bullfrog, the Amargosa and a settlement between them called Jumpertown. A townsite was laid out nearby and given the name Rhyolite from the silica-rich volcanic rock in the area. Today you can find several remnants of Rhyolite’s glory days. Some of the walls of the 3 story bank building are still standing, as is part of the old jail. The train depot (privately owned) is one of the few complete buildings left in the town, as is the Bottle House. The Bottle House was restored by Paramount pictures in Jan, 1925. The ghost town of Rhyolite is on a mixture of federal and private land. It is not within the boundary of Death Valley National Park. Tourism flourished in and near Death Valley in the 1920s, and souvenir sellers set up tables in Rhyolite to sell rocks and bottles on weekends. In the 1930s, Revert Mercantile of Beatty acquired a Union Oil distributorship, built a gas station in Beatty, and supplied pumps in other locations, including Rhyolite. The Rhyolite service station consisted of an old caboose, a storage tank, and a pump, managed by a local owner. In 1937, the train depot became a casino and bar called the Rhyolite Ghost Casino, which was later turned into a small museum and curio shop that remained open into the 1970s. In 1984, Belgian artist Albert Szukalski created his sculpture The Last Supper on Golden Street near the Rhyolite railway depot. The art became part of the Goldwell Open Air Museum, an outdoor sculpture park near the southern entrance to the ghost town.

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Reviewed by
cottoncandy84

  • 4 Reviews
  • 4 Helpful
February 16, 2016
Rated 4.0

Beautiful place to find old cars and history but beware that you can not actually get close to any of the towns structures because they are all fenced off.

2 people found this review helpful

Reviewed by
tracella

  • 1 Review
  • 1 Helpful
November 04, 2014

The Mercantile building was struck by lightning this year and burnt to the ground. http://www.reviewjournal.com/news/nevada/fire-destroys-historic-building-rhyolite

1 person found this review helpful

Reviewed by
acelona

  • 6 Reviews
  • 0 Helpful
April 17, 2017
Rated 4.0

Cool location for some photos. There are several buildings in various states of decay, an old station house, mine shafts, a graveyard, and some really funky sculptures out here. Worth the trip to any photo aficionado.

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Rhyolite Ghost Town

Off Highway 374
Beatty, Nevada
89003 USA

Hours not available

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  • Independent
  • Pet Friendly
  • No Wifi
  • Yes Parking

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